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Hungry Ghost Festival

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); #gallery-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Ethnic Chinese devottees carry a giant paper-mache statue of Chinese deity know as ‘Da Shi Ye’ or ‘Guardian God of Ghosts’ to set it on fire during a festive event of the Ghost Month in Kajang, Malaysia, on Aug. 16. In Chinese tradition the seventh month of the lunar year is regarded as the Ghost Month in which spirits and ghosts come down to earth. Chinese in many countries celebrate the festival during which devotees burn paper-made models to appease the wandering spirits and offers prayers. The statue gets torched. Lighting a candle in Kajang Saturday. It is believed that the gates of hell open during the Ghost Month, and dead ancestors return to visit their relatives. In ‘Getai’ song stages, such as this one earlier this month, opulently costumed belt out hits in Hokkien, Cantonese and Mandarin. They’re held in many Singapore neighborhoods during the Hungry Ghost Festival. A temple in Singapore’s Chinatown getting dressed up earlier this month.

A man prayed after burning hell money in Kuala Lumpur Monday.

Devotees throw “hell money” before setting fire to a 20 foot (6.10 m) high paper-made statue of the Guardian God of Ghosts in Kajang, Malaysia, on Aug. 16.

Performers burn incense near a song stage in Singapore.

Ethnic Chinese in Kajang, Malaysia, carrying a paper-mache statue of the Guardian God of Ghosts Friday before setting it alight. In Chinese tradition, the seventh month of the lunar year is as Hungry Ghost Month—when spirits and ghosts come down to earth—so burn paper versions of items ranging from money (called ‘hell money’) and houses to cars and iPads to appease the wandering spirits.